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Cathie Marsh Institute for Social Research

Introduction to Mathematical Concepts for Social Statistics

Date: 9 June 2016
Time:10am — 5pm
Instructor: Angelo Moretti
Level: Introductory
Fee: £195 (£140 for those from educational and charitable institutions).  The Cathie Marsh Institute (CMIST) offers five free places to research staff and students within the Faculty of Humanities at The University of Manchester and the North West Doctoral Training Centre.  Postgraduate students requesting a free place will be required to provide a letter of support from their supervisor.

Course summary

The course covers the following essential topics in mathematics: back to basics (percentages, proportions, averages), data and tables, describing and visualizing data, measures of spread, transforming data, concepts in algebra and common symbols, geometry of a straight line, limits and continuity, derivatives and more, maximization in statistics, correlations, vectors and matrices, solving a multivariate regression problem. There will be exercises and examples of the use of these concepts in mathematics for statistical applications.  

Course objectives

This course introduces social scientists to the essential mathematics that are utilized in social statistics. After completing this course, students should have a basic understanding of mathematical concepts that form the basis of statistical inference and modeling in the social sciences.

Course requirements

Some prior knowledge of research methods in statistics required. Please bring a calculator.

The course is designed for those interested in pursuing more advanced courses on statistical methods for the social sciences. Some basic understanding of research methods in statistics is required, e.g. basics in Regression Modeling. It is recommended that the students carry out pre-reading according to the reading list below in preparation for the course.  

Preliminary reading

  • Bostock, L. and Chandler, S. (1990). Core Maths for A Level. London: Stanley Thornes LTD.
  • Hagle, T. (1995). Basic Math for Social Scientists: Concepts: 108 (Quantitative Applications in the Social Sciences). London: Sage.
  • Diamond, I. and Jefferies, J. (2001), Beginning Statistics: An Introduction for Social Scientists. London: Sage.

About the instructor

Angelo Moretti

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